Quality custom built wood model military ships, submarines, 
yachts, sailboats, tall ships, sailboats and passenger liners.
~ museum quality, handcrafted, custom-built wooden model ships ~

Yorktown Class and USS Wasp, CV-5 to CV-8
Model featured: CV-6 USS Enterprise
circa Battle of Santa Cruz, October 26th, 1942

Home

Other Military Ships

Other Aircraft Carriers

Testimonials

FAQ

How to Order

Refund Policy

Email:
mail@allwoodships.com


Model comes on base, please very see bottom image.
 

 

 

 

 

-
 
Elevators can be "dual built" ($100 extra) for maximum scenario set-ups so they can be either up, as in top image, or partially up as in this image .
Note aircraft below the elevator in the hanger deck.
-


All hangers are built "open" for maximum see through effect.



Signal flags are added to the halyards as per client request.



Aircraft are shipped "loose" to permit varied set-ups.




Aircraft included representing the squadrons as per circa.



CV-5 USS Yorktown, CV-6 USS Enterprise
or CV-8 USS Hornet
* custom built aircraft carrier models *
Replicated as to your stated circa with hanger doors and elevators as you specify.
We'll contact you for details after you order.

Scale 1:350 / 26"-29"
Price: $1995

1/3 deposit $665

Note: CV-5 model 28" long
CV-6 model 28" long "as built" or 29" long if with refit;
CV-8 model is 29" long; 
Price includes free delivery,
personalized brass plate, ensign/signal flags, and 40 aircraft of different squadrons.

Other size models and different base possible.
Please email us for free quote.

Fully assembled museum quality wooden desk-top display models custom built as to your designated circa including appropriate air wing, flagging and personalized brass plate.

CV-7 USS Wasp - custom built model
Replicated as to your choice for circa, air wing and hanger door positions.
We'll contact you for details after you order.

Scale 1:350 / 26"
Price: $1899

1/3 deposit $633

Price includes free delivery,
personalized brass plate, ensign/signal flags, and 40 aircraft of different squadrons.

Other size models, different bases, aircraft with squadron paint/CAGs, plus specialties like raised blast shields are all possible.
Please email us for free quote.

Fully assembled museum quality wooden desk-top display models custom built as to your designated circa including appropriate air wing, flagging and personalized brass plate.

Commissioned from 1937 to 1941, the Yorktown Class aircraft carriers comprised CV-5 Yorktown, CV-6 Enterprise and CV-8 Hornet. They were designed to the maximum size allowable under London Treaty restrictions. This caused then to be built with inadequate underwater protection, a problem addressed in the later Essex Class. CV-8 Hornet had minor improvements over her two sister ships, including an improved anti-aircraft battery.

CV-7 Wasp was the only vessel of her class built, and was not part of the Yorktown Class.

Yorktown was lost at the Battle of Midway in June 1942, and Hornet four months later in the Battle of Santa Cruz. Enterprise got an updated AA battery of twenty 40mm guns at Puget Sound in late 1943 (amongst other improvements) and was the sole survivor of the class - escaping disaster in the Pacific time after time so that she became  nicknamed "Lucky E".

History of CV-6 "USS Enterprise"

Named to commemorate six US warships which had previously borne the name, CV-6 USS Enterprise was commissioned in 1938 and was the only carrier in her class that survived the conflict in the Pacific. She engaged in every major carrier action, except one (Coral Sea) and became the most decorated ship of WWII. The ship was re-fitted in 1943, decommissioned in 1947 and then "moth-balled".
* Reclassified as an Attack Aircraft Carrier and redesignated CVA-6, October 1952, while in reserve.
* Reclassified as an Antisubmarine Warfare Support Aircraft Carrier and redesignated CVS-6, August 1953, while in reserve. Efforts to save the ship as a memorial at Washington DC failed due to lack of funds. Sold in July 1958, she was scrapped at Kearny, NJ, from late 1958 to early 1960.

Battle of Santa Cruz

The Battle of Santa Cruz took place on October 26, 1942 as a result of a Japanese desire to take back Henderson Airfield on Guadalcanal from the US Marines (who had gained control of it) by attacking the US fleet that was supporting the Marines.

The Japanese fleet consisted of the four heavy and light aircraft carriers CV Shokaku, CV Zuikaku, CVE Junyo and CVL Zuiho, 4 battleships, 9 cruisers, 25 destroyers and 11 submarines. On the US side was a fleet about half that size with only two aircraft carriers (CV-6 Enterprise and CV-8 Hornet), 1 battleship, 6 cruisers and 14 destroyers. However, never at anytime during the battle did the surface ships of the opposing sides ever make contact. Hence it was mostly a battle of the airplanes from both sides trying to destroy the opposing fleets.

At the start of the battle the Japanese had 199 operational aircraft (80 Zero fighters, 61 Val dive bombers, 1 Judy experimental dive bomber and 57 Kate torpedo planes) while the US had 134 aircraft (62 F4F Wildcat fighters, 25 SBD-3 Dauntless dive bombers, 23 SBD-3 scouts and 24 TBF-1 Avenger torpedo planes).

During the course of the battle, planes from the Japanese carriers made at least eight attacks on the US ships, damaging both carriers, the battleship, one cruiser and two destroyers - at a cost of about 100 planes. Hornet and a destroyer were so extensively damaged that they were abandoned and sunk. Enterprise was damaged by four bombs - two very near misses and two hits. Three waves of aircraft from Hornet and Enterprise succeeded in damaging two of the Japanese carriers, two destroyers and sinking a light cruiser - with the loss of 74 planes. Basically, both sides lost half their aircraft and had to withdraw their mauled carriers. The last of the carrier battles around Guadalcanal, the Battle of Santa Cruz set the conditions for the coming surface fleet actions in the Naval Battles of Guadalcanal the following month.

Although the carrier battle had been costly with the American ship losses higher than the enemy's, the Marines on Guadalcanal retained control of Henderson Airfield and bought time to prepare for the final battles of Guadalcanal.

 

CV-5 to CV-8 comparison
Aircraft Carrier Notes Length
max.
Tonnage max. Speed
knots
Crew /
Aircraft
Aviation Facilities Armament at
commissioning
Comm.
as CV
Fate
CV-5 Yorktown Was the maximum size allowed under London Treaty restrictions 809.5 ft 25,500 32 2217
/ 90+
3 elevators;
2 flight-deck catapults
8 single 5" guns,
4 quad 1.1" and
24 - .50 cal
1937 Lost at Battle of Midway, June 1942
CV-6 Enterprise
Yorktown Class
Most decorated WW2 ship, re-designated
CVA-6 (1952) and CVS-6 (1953)
809.5 ft
827 feet after refit 1943
25,500 32 2,217 to 2,909
/ 90+
3 elevators;
2 flight-deck catapults
8 single 5" guns,
4 quad 1.1" and
24 - .50 cal
1938 Effort to turn into memorial failed
sold for scrap, July 1958
CV-7 Wasp
(own class)
Fitted with a folding,
T-shaped, deck-edge elevator
741 ft 19,116 29 1,800
/ 80
3 elevators,
2 flight-deck catapults
8 single 5" guns,
4 quad 1.1" and
24 - .50 cal
1940 Lost in action at Guadalcanal, September 1942
CV-8 Hornet, modified
Yorktown Class
Minor improvements over her two sister ships 824 ft 25,600 32 2,919
/ 100
3 elevators,
2 flight-deck catapults
8 single 5" guns,
4 quad 1.1" and
24 - .50 cal
1941 Doolittle Raid in April of 1942. Lost during Battle of Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942

CVA = Attack Aircraft Carrier
CV- Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier
CVS = Anti-submarine Warfare Support Aircraft Carrier
 
Mahogany wood base, real brass pedestals and descriptive plate enhance this elegant historical model.

View the "CV Pictorial Page" for other great images of our detailing

2002-2017 All Wood Ships - All Rights Reserved